Handbook of thick film technology
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Handbook of thick film technology

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Published by Electrochemical Publications in Ayr, Scot .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Thick films

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographies and indexes.

Statementby P.J. Holmes and R.G. Loasby.
ContributionsLoasby, R.G.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsTK7871.15F5 H33
The Physical Object
Paginationxxii, 430 p. :
Number of Pages430
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21577071M

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“Handbook of Thin Film Technology” covers all aspects of coatings preparation, characterization and applications. Different deposition techniques based on vacuum and plasma processes are presented.   The general chapter layout is practically the same as the old book, with changes, of course, to reflect on new technology. The first chapter is entitled Development of Thick Film Technology with the byline of R.G. Loasby and P.J. Holmes (revised K. Pitt). As a guestimate, it is about 60 per cent the original material and 40 per cent "revision".Cited by: 4. About this book “Handbook of Thin Film Technology” covers all aspects of coatings preparation, characterization and applications. Different deposition techniques based on vacuum and plasma processes are presented. Handbook of Thin Film Technology covers all aspects of coatings preparation, characterization and applications. Different deposition techniques based on vacuum and plasma processes are presented. Methods of surface and thin film analysis including coating thickness, structural, optical, electrical, mechanical and magnetic properties of films.

  The first edition of the Handbook of Thick Film Technology has been a standard reference for the electronics industry since its publication by Electrochemical Publications in The original edition was edited by P.J. Holmes and R.G. Loasby with . First in the new series, Handbook of Sensors and Actuators, which will examine a broad range of topics across the discipline, this volume explores thick-film technology. The area has already achieved a high rank in the families of advanced solid sensor technologies but there has been limited acknowledgement of its future potential. Thin film is the general term used for coatings that are used to modify and increase the functionality of a bulk surface or substrate. They are used to protect surfaces from wear, improve lubricity, improve corrosion and chemical resistance, and provide a barrier to gas penetration. Engineered materials are the future of thin film technology. Advanced, high-performance computers, high-definition TV, digital camcorders, sensitive broadband imaging systems, flat-panel displays, robotic systems, and medical electronics and diagnostics are but a few examples of miniaturized device technologies that depend the utilization of thin film materials. The Handbook of Thin Films Materials is a.

Summary This chapter contains sections titled: Thick‐Film Processing Screen Printing References Recommended Reading Thick‐Film Deposition Techniques - Handbook of Thick‐ and Thin‐Film Hybrid Microelectronics - Wiley Online Library. Try the new Google Books. Check out the new look and enjoy easier access to your favorite features. Try it now. No thanks. Try the new Google Books Get print book. No eBook available Handbook of thin film technology. Leon I. Maissel, Reinhard Glang. McGraw-Hill, - Technology & Engineering - 21 pages. 1 Review. From inside the book.4/5(1). Handbook of Thin Film Technology covers all aspects of coatings preparation, characterization and applications. Different deposition techniques based on vacuum and plasma processes are presented. Thick film technology is sometimes referred to as an additive technology in that the layers are built up in sequence without the need to remove (or subtract) parts of the film by techniques such as etching. Compare this with, say, a standard printed circuit board (PCB), where the conductive tracks are formed by selectively etching away the undesired areas (gaps) from a continuous copper layer.